Monday, June 6, 2016

DNF Alert: The Dark Days Club

Alison Goodman - The Dark Days Club (Lady Helen #1)
Published: January 26, 2016 by Viking Books For Young Readers
Genres: Historical Fiction, Fantasy, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 482
Find on: Amazon, Book Depository, Goodreads
Rating: D-N-F

New York Times bestseller Alison Goodman’s eagerly awaited new project: a Regency adventure starring a stylish and intrepid demon-hunter!

London, April 1812. On the eve of eighteen-year-old Lady Helen Wrexhall’s presentation to the queen, one of her family’s housemaids disappears-and Helen is drawn into the shadows of Regency London. There, she meets Lord Carlston, one of the few who can stop the perpetrators: a cabal of demons infiltrating every level of society. Dare she ask for his help, when his reputation is almost as black as his lingering eyes? And will her intelligence and headstrong curiosity wind up leading them into a death trap?

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DNF @ (?) (Somewhere in Chapter 9.)

I assume when you're rich, you have a lot of time on your hands. Helen, for the most part, is remarkably un-busy. After her mother dies, she and her brother, Andrew, are fortunate enough to be taken in by their wealthy aunt and uncle. Helen is waited on by maids, changes dresses every five minutes, and watches horseraces.

When one of the maids - named Darby - approaches her, worriedly, she's immediately by her side. One of the other maids has gone missing and Helen wants to do anything she can to help. Her uncle, the man of the house, suggests she keep out of the maids' business.

First of all: Who has the time? The maid approaches Helen with this dilemma and she doesn't even think about it. Okay, she's selfless. Nice. Give America Singer the Disney Princess an award. In Vanderpump Rules, the waitresses and bartenders often try to feed petty gossip to the owner of the restaurant, their boss, Lisa, and 99.9%, she's like: "What does this have to do with my restaurant?" Because honestly. Can you not find a better hobby?

The designated love interest is Lord Carlston. His dark eyes are a prominent fixture of the story. I mean, he's interesting, but I wasn't swooning out of my chair for him. When he and Helen first meet, he flings a photo frame at her head. Given, she catches it. But still. I don't have those reflexes.

I think this is a prime example of #RichPeopleProblems. "Oh well. Since the dress collection is looking exceptionally stale, I may as well follow the maid for ten minutes." Also, Helen wants everyone to keep bringing up her mother, who is dead? I mean, I understand (but not really) realistically, who wants to talk about a dead woman all day? Take several seats, Helen.

So it wasn't for me, but a majority of the reviews say the latter. Maybe you should check it out, anyway?

4 comments:

  1. I'm sorry this book wasn't to your liking! It's a huge book so I haven't had time to read it, but this review makes me feel slightly better about that. Thank you for sharing!

    Brittany @ Brittany's Book Rambles

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    1. I know. Such a gigantic read! I was like: "What the????" I usually love the gigantic reads, but I couldn't deal with all this historical nonsense. Thanks!

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  2. Yeah no. I cannot handle rich people shit. Like, I barely have time to shower most days, so someone changing ball gowns every 10 minutes isn't going to fly. And now, even rereading the synopsis bored me. You lessened my TBR by one book, yay! Like, I don't usually remove a book based on one review, but the stuff you didn't like, I KNOW I won't like so... off it goes. Plus, I don't have time for 500 boring pages of anything. Great review, sorry this didn't work for you!

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    1. hahaha SAME. I am so over it #RichPeopleProbs as a whole and this book seriously exaggerates it. Ooh, yay! Seriously, we are review-y twins!

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