Blog Tour Review: Fantastic Mr. Fox

Roald Dahl & Quentin Blake - Fantastic Mr. Fox
Published: June 11, 2002 by Knopf Books for Young Readers (first published in 1970)
Genres: Middle Grade
Pages: 96
Rating: 4.5/5 (Because it's Roald Dahl. DUH.)
Find on: Amazon, Book Depository, Goodreads
Fantastic Mr. Fox is on the run! The three meanest farmers around are out to get him. Fat Boggis, squat Bunce, and skinny Bean have joined forces, and they have Mr. Fox and his family surrounded. What they don’t know is that they’re not dealing with just any fox–Mr. Fox would never surrender. But only the most fantastic plan ever can save him now.
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I haven't read too much children's literature. (Expanding my vocabulary a tad, so you may find me a tad bit more obnoxious since I've been in college.) Just look at me. I'm using terms like "a tad." Blegh.

ANYWAY.

I actually haven't read any of Roald Dahl's work. For shame, I KNOW. I adore the remake of Charlie and The Charlie Factory, and in elementary school, we did a James and The Giant Peach-food themed project. An appropriately-sized peach surrounded by gummy sharks and chocolate sauce.

So anyway, I was delighted with Fantastic Mr. Fox. In more ways than one. Contrary to the reviews, which called it sexist. Calm down, haters. Really. It's a children's book. Mr. Fox lives in a hole with his wife, Mrs. Fox, and their four children, the Baby Foxes. Unfortunately, a group of farmers decide to terrorize them, threatening them from their underground tunnel when they quarrel over the farmer's dinner,

Mr. Fox recruits The Badger, The Rat, and a few of his Baby Foxes who help to scare away the farmers in the wackiest ways possible.
 "You saucy beast!" said Mr. Fox. "I should have guessed we'd find you down here somewhere."
"Go away!" shrieked Rat. "Go on, beat it! This is my private pitch!"
"Shut up," said Mr. Fox.
"I will not shut up!" shrieked Rat. "This is my place! I got here first!"

SUCH a blast.

I'm not trying to be a killjoy, but it's slightly violentberries for its directed age. Mr. Fox has a great half of his tail maimed. The farmers enjoy pointing their guns at everyone. I mean, don't get me wrong, I love me some Roald Dahl humor. Personally, this book had me dying, but I wouldn't read it to my child. If you wanted to, you could probably censor certain aspects, like gun to confetti cannon, blood to blossoms, etc.

One of the illustrations seriously bothered me, though. Mr. Fox and one of his animal friends stumble upon a page roomful of cooked turkeys, and they're like, "Look at these gorgeously delectable birds!" And you'll be stunned to find it's pretty much a pageful of blobs. It took me a moment to properly recognize what it was. Maybe the illustrator's hand had became tired, and he was over drawing roasted bird. Either way, it's still a great book.

I seriously love the ending, and I'd feel wrong spoiling it, especially since it's so cute. Although, the farmers are so stereotypical and annoying, you might find some similarities of them those in The Princess and The Frog. I think we should all read a little more Roald Dahl.
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About ROALD DAHL:
Roald Dahl (1916–1990) was one of the world’s most imaginative, successful and beloved storytellers. He was born in Wales of Norwegian parents and spent much of his childhood in England. After establishing himself as a writer for adults with short story collections such as Kiss Kiss and Tales of the Unexpected, Roald Dahl began writing children's stories in 1960 while living with his family in both the U.S. and in England. His first stories were written as entertainment for his own children, to whom many of his books are dedicated.

Roald Dahl’s first children’s story, The Gremlins, was a story about little creatures that were responsible for the various mechanical failures on airplanes. The Gremlins came to the attention of both First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who loved to read the story to her grandchildren, and Walt Disney, with whom Roald Dahl had discussions about the production of a movie.

Roald Dahl was inspired by American culture and by many of the most quintessential American landmarks to write some of his most memorable passages, such as the thrilling final scenes in James and the Giant Peach - when the peach lands on the Empire State Building! Upon the publication of James and the Giant Peach, Roald Dahl began work on the story that would later be published as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and today, Roald Dahl’s stories are available in 58 languages and, by a conservative estimate, have sold more than 200 million copies.

Roald Dahl also enjoyed great success for the screenplays he wrote for both the James Bond film You Only Live Twice in 1967 and for Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, released one year later, which went on to become a beloved family film.  Roald Dahl’s popularity continues to increase as his fantastic novels, including James and the Giant Peach, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Matilda, The BFG, and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, delight an ever-growing legion of fans. 

Two charities have been founded in Roald Dahl’s memory: the first charity, Roald Dahl’s Marvellous Children’s Charity, created in 1991, focuses on making life better for seriously ill children through the funding of specialist nurses, innovative medical training, hospitals, and individual families across the UK.

The second charity, The Roald Dahl Museum and Story Centre – a unique cultural, literary and education hub – opened in June 2005 in Great Missenden where Roald Dahl lived and wrote many of his best-loved works. 10% of income from Roald Dahl books and adaptations are donated to the two Roald Dahl charities.

On September 13, 2006, the first national Roald Dahl Day was celebrated, on what would have been the author’s 90th birthday. The event proved such a success that Roald Dahl Day is now marked annually all over the world. September 13, 2016 is Roald Dahl 100, marking 100 years since the birth of the world’s number one storyteller. There will be celebrations for Roald Dahl 100 throughout 2016, delivering a year packed with gloriumptious treats and surprises for everyone.

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